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Helen Cui

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Personal Photograph
Office: Min Kao 502
E-mail:
ude.ktu@iucneleh
Phone: 865-974-3461
Fax: 865-974-5483
Address: Min H. Kao Building, Room 502
1520 Middle Drive
Knoxville, TN 37996-2250

Biography

Han (Helen) Cui is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Tennessee. She received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from Tianjin Univerisity, Tianjin, China, in 2011, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, in 2013 and 2017, respectively, both in electrical engineering. From 2017 to 2019, Dr. Cui was with the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at University of California, Los Angeles as a post-doctoral researcher to expand the knowledge of magnetics modeling for ultra-high frequency applications. Her research interests include high-efficiency power converters, magnetic components for power electronics and microwave applications, high-density integration and packaging, and micromagnetic physics.

Publications

Last updated May 19, 2020.

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Journal Papers
Title
Year
  • Han Cui; Zhi Yao; Yuanxun Ethan Wang
    IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques
    2019

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    A physics-based nonlinear circuit model is developed for frequency-selective limiters (FSLs) based on thin-film magnetic materials. The equivalent circuit model is structured and its parameters are determined rigorously from the fundamental physics of electromagnetic waves and spin waves. The spin motions as well as the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) are modeled by RLC parallel circuits with parameters derived from Polder's tensor and Kittel's equations. The exchange coupling between spins is modeled by an inductor added between adjacent RLC circuits based on quantum spin theory. The nonlinear crossfrequency coupling from signal at ω to spin waves at ω/2 is represented by a nonlinear coupled inductor model that follows the mathematics of a pendulum motion to represent the parametric oscillations of spins. The circuit units are cascaded to describe the spin-wave propagation inside the magnetic material, and transmission line parameters are added finally to describe the electromagnetic wave propagation. An FSL device described in the literature is used as an example to validate the circuit model, and the model successfully predicts the power-dependent insertion loss as well as the threshold power level, time delay, and frequency selectivity of the power limiting effect.

  • Han Cui; Khai D. T. Ngo
    IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics
    2019

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    A methodology to develop a subcircuit model for core loss simulation in LTspice is presented. The subcircuit implements the dynamic core loss model used in the transient solver of finite-element analysis (FEA) in order to provide equivalent results in the time domain for ferrite materials. The wipe-out rule is applied in the simulation so that the core loss during the transient behavior can be predicted. A field factor is derived from an effective flux density for a nonuniform flux distribution to simplify the relationship between the current and the field for arbitrary magnetic core shapes. The interface of the subcircuit is capable of being integrated to any power stage simulations. Simulation results of core loss equivalent to the FEA on an exemplary plate-core inductor are obtained from the subcircuit that significantly reduces computational cost.

  • Han Cui; Joyce Mullenix; Roberto Massolini; Khai D. T. Ngo
    IEEE Transactions on Magnetics
    2017

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    An inductor with winding sandwiched between two core plates is analyzed to model the nonuniform distribution of magnetic field. The winding is placed near the edge of the core to maximize the energy within the limited footprint such that the amount of energy stored outside the core volume is not negligible. The proportional-reluctance, equal-flux model is developed to build the contours with equal amount of flux by governing the reluctance of the flux path. The shapes of the flux lines are modeled by different functions that are guided by the finite-element simulation. The field calculated from the flux lines enables calculation of inductance, winding loss, and core loss. The inductance is used as a figure of merit to evaluate the modeling accuracy. Prototypes made of flexible circuit for inductors with different layouts are measured to verify the model. The measured inductances agree with the modeled result by less than 13% error.

  • Han Cui; Khai D. T. Ngo
    IEEE Transactions on Industrial Electronics
    2017

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    A “distributed inductor” comprises a core containing multiple winding windows carrying prescribed Ampere-turns. Its magnetic field can be shaped to vary by less than a distribution factor υ. The positions, dimensions, and Ampere-turns of the windings are synthesized to improve the energy density. A design procedure is formulated to accentuate the impact of υ on the tradeoffs between inductance and losses. It is validated by a prototype having half the height of the commercial counterpart for a 30 W converter.

  • Han Cui; Khai D. T. Ngo; Jim Moss; Michele Hui Fern Lim; Ernesto Rey
    IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics
    2014

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    The “constant-flux” concept is leveraged to achieve high magnetic-energy density, leading to inductor geometries with height significantly lower than that of conventional products. Techniques to shape the core and to distribute the winding turns to shape a desirable field profile are described for the two basic classes of magnetic geometries: those with the winding enclosed by the core and those with the core enclosed by the winding. A relatively constant flux distribution is advantageous not only from the density standpoint, but also from the thermal standpoint via the reduction of hot spots, and from the reliability standpoint via the suppression of flux crowding. In this journal paper on a constant-flux inductor (CFI) with enclosed winding, the foci are operating principle, dc analysis, and basic design procedure. Prototype cores and windings were routed from powder-iron disks and copper sheets, respectively. The design of CFI was validated by the assembled inductor prototype.

Conference Papers
Title
Year
  • Zhi Yao; Han Cui; Rüstü Umut Tok; Yuanxun Ethan Wang
    2019 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting
    2019

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    An unconditionally stable three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm has been proposed to solve simultaneously Maxwell's equations and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with full nonlinear effects. The proposed algorithm can predict the dynamic interaction between magnetic spins and EM fields. The accuracy of the modeling has been validated by 1. Small signal simulation of a linear ferrite isolator and 2. Large signal simulation of the dispersive permeability of a continuous ferrite film. The simulations agree with the theoretical and experimental predictions, under both linear and nonlinear circumstances. Specifically, the algorithm has fully revealed that sufficiently large RF power can decrease the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) frequency and suppress the permeability.

  • Han Cui; Zhi Yao; Y. Ethan Wang
    2019 IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium (IMS)
    2019

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    A nonlinear circuit model is developed for magnetic material based frequency-selective limiters (FSL). The dominant magnetic-behaviors of FSL devices are translated into equivalent circuits with parameters rigorously determined from fundamental physics. The spin motions as well as the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) are modeled by RLC parallel circuits with parameters derived from Polder's tensor and Kittel's equations. The exchange coupling between spins is modeled by an inductor added between adjacent RLC circuits based on quantum spin theory. The nonlinear cross-frequency coupling from signal at ω to spin waves at ω/2 is represented by a pendulum model that predicts the parametric oscillations of spins. A FSL device described in literature is used as an example to validate the circuit model. The simulation results match the measurement results published, and the model successfully predicts the threshold power level, nonlinear insertion loss, time delay, and frequency selectivity of the device.

  • Zhi Yao; Han Cui; Yuanxun Ethan Wang
    2019 IEEE MTT-S International Microwave Symposium (IMS)
    2019

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    An unconditionally stable three-dimensional (3D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm has been proposed to predict the dynamic interaction between nonlinear magnetic spins and electromagnetic (EM) fields in nonlinear magnetic devices. The proposed modeling solves simultaneously Maxwell's equations and the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation with full nonlinear effects. The accuracy of the modeling has been validated by 1. Small signal simulation of a linear ferrite isolator and 2. Large signal simulation of the dispersive permeability of a continuous ferrite film. The simulations agree with the theoretical and experimental predictions. The fact that the 2-μm-thick film exhibits strong nonlinearity shows the potential of magnetic thin film applied in miniature RF front ends.

  • Han Cui; Khai D. T. Ngo; Jim Moss; Michele Lim; Ernesto Rey
    2014 IEEE Energy Conversion Congress and Exposition (ECCE)
    2014

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    The “constant-flux” concept introduced recently is leveraged to distribute magnetic flux to improve energy density, lowering the profile of an inductor. The optimal flux distribution with normalized parameters is identified mathematically, and verified by simulation. It is then applied to reduce the dc resistance of a commercial inductor by a factor of two, keeping the outer dimensions and inductance the same. Thermal-limited current rating is improved by 50%, whereas saturation-limited current rating is improved by 20% thanks to the suppression of flux crowding. The simulation result is verified by measurement results of a prototype under high current bias.

  • Han Cui; Khai D. T. Ngo
    2013 Twenty-Eighth Annual IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition (APEC)
    2013

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    The “constant-flux” concept is leveraged to achieve high magnetic-energy density, leading to inductor geometries with height significantly lower than that of conventional products. Techniques to shape the core and to distribute the winding turns to shape a desirable field profile is described for the two basic classes of magnetic geometries, those with the core outside the winding and those with the core inside the winding. A relatively constant flux distribution is advantageous not only from the density standpoint, but also from the thermal standpoint via the reduction of hot spots, and from the reliability standpoint via the suppression of flux crowding. Design and fabrication results are delineated for a core-outside inductor with same specifications as a commercial counterpart, but with smaller footprint as well as smaller height. Prototype cores and windings were milled from powder-iron disks and copper sheets, respectively. The volume of the prototyped constant-flux inductor is 66% the volume of a commercial inductor with same inductance and dc resistance.